Amazing Ibiza and Formentera yachting locations today

Beautiful Ibiza yacht sailing places today? Croatia is a firm favourite European destination for anyone looking for a sailing holiday. This country consists of many picture-perfect islands, historic towns, and wonderful local culture. Croatia is full of natural beauty and is an easily accessible country for sailing around. Some of the top cruising destinations for a holiday in Croatia include Dubrovnik, Split, Kornati, Zadar, and Hvar. There are also smaller islands, like Vis and Korcula that offer incredible experiences.

Sitting on the eastern tip of Croatia’s coast, Dubrovnik is ideal for those looking to take some time out to recharge and enjoy the delights of discovering a new city. Bordered by sparkling Adriatic water, Dubrovnik is known for its Gothic architecture, dramatic terrain and buildings capped by baked clay-red rooves. The pace of life is slower in the city, so be sure to take some time to walk the stone streets and soak up the charms of Croatia. Trees grow everywhere, infusing the air with the scent of sweet figs and bitter oranges, for which Dubrovnik is renowned. If you’re visiting during summer, you’d be remiss not to check out the Dubrovnik Summer Festival. This celebration of classical musical sees the city come to life with music and art, with plenty of concerts and recitals on the schedule.

The Spanish island of Ibiza boasts some of the most beautiful beaches in the world. Whether you’re into snorkelling in isolated coves, bathing in waters that redefine the word turquoise, or hanging out with celebrities in famous beach bars, there’s something here for everyone. Read on for the ten best beaches on the White Island. Read more info at Intersailclub. Honeymooners and couples can relax in Ibiza’s crystal-clear waters, enjoy unforgettable sunsets, explore its natural beauty spots, taste local renowned cuisine and have fun in an evening out at one of the famous nightclubs and bars. During the day, try one of the diverse leisure activities: visit a hippie market, book a day boat tour to famous Formentera, go on-board and try a diving experience, join a tour and discover the island by Vespa bike, visit a farm-house and learn how to produce traditional herb liquor and artisan soap …

High season refers to the most popular weeks of the year for yacht charter, whether it’s the winter period in the Caribbean or the height of summer in the Mediterranean, booking in high season requires early planning, determination and a big budget. In addition, planning a yacht charter to coincide with a major event will also be reflected in the price with marine spots for elite events often booking up early. Allow plenty of time when making enquiries to ensure a star studded, well prepared arrival. Knowing the base price of your charter is just the starting point, however, depending on the location, which often governs the terms of the contract, more or less may be included in the base price of your charter. Bear in mind that every charter yacht, because they are privately owned and the owner sets the rules, is slightly different. One yacht may include a “standard” selection of wines with every meal and charge only to upgrade the vintages, while on another yacht the wines are a la carte.

You might not always get the good weather but this part of the UK equals many of its European rivals in beauty. Over 95 miles of uniquely formed ancient coastline stretch all the way from East Devon to Dorset. Otherwise known as the Jurassic Coast, some of the rock formations here are 185 million years old and its England’s first natural World Heritage Site. Set sail from Weymouth Harbour and stop off at all the local beauty spots – Durdle Door, Lulworth cove and countless historic coastal villages.

Sailing tip of the day: Overlaying radar on the chart helps to interpret the display! The biggest problem most of us face when interpreting radar is lack of familiarity. We go about our daily business most of the year, then come aboard, hit the fog and turn it on. Unfortunately, unlike GPS, AIS and the rest, radar is more of a conversation between the operator and the instrument, so it’s not surprising we have trouble interpreting the picture. When I’m motoring, I, therefore, make a practice of keeping my radar transmitting even in good visibility and running an overlay on the chartplotter to keep me familiar with its drawbacks. The image above, for example, clearly shows that what the radar sees may not stack up with what the chart is telling me. Note how the trace seems mysteriously to end halfway up the coast. So it does, but that’s because the echo returning from high cliffs in the south gets lost when the land falls away to lower-lying estuarial terrain. The echo ends either because the flat shoreline isn’t providing a good enough target, or because the coast falls below the scanner’s visual horizon.