Why visit Croatia and Slovenia and the region weather

Kroatien. Istrien. Rovinj. Luftaufnahme von Rovinj in Istrien mit Blick auf die Altstadt. Im Hintergrund eine Inselkette.

You must see Croatia and Slovenia at least once? Boasting a rich history that can be traced back as far as the 11th century, the attractive Dalmatian city of Sibenik has much to offer tourists to Croatia. While not always as busy as other popular destinations within this beautiful country, there’s no shortage of great things to do here. Start by exploring the perfectly-preserved historic Old Town center. Here, you’ll find elegant 15th- and 16th-century architecture, along with numerous attractions worth visiting. Visit the 15th-century Cathedral of St. James (Katedrala Sv Jakova), a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the finest churches in all of Croatia. Also worth visiting are the remains of St. John’s Fortress, perched high upon a hill overlooking the town and boasting magnificent views over the Adriatic, and the equally important St. Michael’s Fortress, popular for the traditional cultural performances hosted on its delightful open-air stage.

The Slovenian underground hides thousands of caves. Among those, twenty-two are open to the public, and Postojna Cave is the most visited. A 90-minute guided tour takes visitors through caverns, halls, and passages that were carved by the Pivka River. Inside the cave, there are beautiful karst formations, some of which are millions of years old. Several times a year concert events are set inside the cave, and as a part of Postojna Cave’s Christmas traditions, a nativity scene with live actors is set in December.

Rovinj is one of the most picturesque towns in the Mediterranean. With its pastel-colored houses clustered together on steep winding streets it is a great place to wonder around. Rovinj is still an active fishing port and visitors can take a boat to the lovely offshore islands. The area around Rovinj has been described as an “outstanding scenic wonder” because of the pristine beauty of the indented coastline and its forests.

Fanning out right into the boundless blue waters of the Adriatic Sea, the walled city of Dubrovnik is something that can be termed as nothing less than ‘Awe-Inspiring.’ Enjoying the elevated status of UNESCO World Heritage Site, Dubrovnik, by default, becomes an outstanding destination in the uncharted waters of Croatia travel for a casual tourist. For the adrenaline addicts, activities like kayaking, swimming, and a host of other water activities add to the thrill. And for the fans of Game of Thrones, Dubrovnik’s fortifications create some deja vu. A sweeping view of the city can be enjoyed by climbing up Mount Srd, which remains effortlessly accessible via cable car or on foot. Read even more details at Ptuj vreme.

Toochepin is a two-day rock festival that takes in August each year in Tucepi. Check their website for concert details. A half marathon starting and ending in Omis and heading out through part of the Cetina River canyon takes place each year at the end of September. Placed at the foot of the mountain Biokovo, expect glorious views of the sea and the charming town, backdropped by a spectacular mountain range. It offers a stunning contrast at sundown or sunset, as the colours of the rocks and buildings seem to change shades almost every minute in response to the ebbing strength of the sun’s rays.

Opatija was one of the most popular retreats for the wealthy during the time of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and today it remains one of the chicest destinations in Croatia. Spectacular mansions left over from this period line the coast, lending the city a certain air of grandeur. The weather is excellent all year round, and tourists are well catered to, with plenty of spas, restaurants, and upscale hotels. The city is fronted by a 12-km-long coastal promenade, and visitors wishing to jump in the warm waters of the Adriatic can do so in one of the area’s beautiful sheltered bays. See additional information at https://vreme-si.com/.